According to a post by Thomas MacEntee the sessions to be streamed live from RootsTech 2012 have been announced. I’ve consolidated them here into a single easy to view list…

RootsTech 2012 Streaming Schedule
Thursday 2 Feb Friday 3 Feb Saturday 4 Feb
8:30 -10:00 Keynote – Inventing the Future, as a Community – Jay Verkler 8:30- 9:30 Keynote – Exabyte Social Clouds and other Monstrosities – Josh Coates 8:30 – 9:30 Keynote – Making the most of technology to further the family history industry – Tim Sullivan
9:45 – 10:45 Publish Your Genealogy Online – Laura Prescott 9:45 – 10:45 Genealogy Podcasts and Blogs 101 – Lisa Louise Cooke
11:00 – 12:00 Do I Trust the Cloud? – D. Joshua Taylor 11:00 – 12:00 Optimizing Your Site for Search Engines – Robert Gardner 11:00 – 12:00 Future of FamilySearch Family Tree – Ron Tanner
1:45 – 2:45 Effective Database Search Tactics – Kory Meyerink 1:45 – 2:45 Genealogists “Go Mobile” – Sandra Crowley 1:45 – 2:45 Privacy in a Collaborative Environment – Noah Tutak
3:00 – 4:00 Twitter – It’s Not Just “What I Had For Breakfast” Anymore – Thomas MacEntee 3:00 – 4:00 Google’s Toolbar and Genealogy – David Barney
4:15 – 5:15 Eleven Layers of Online Searches – Barbara Rennick

 

I know I’ll be tuning in to listen to a number of these – how about you??

 

 

 

From Jill Ball – Geniaus – and Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun we have this tonight…

The Ancestors’ Geneameme

The list should be annotated in the following manner:
Things you have already done or found: bold face type
Things you would like to do or find: italicize (colour optional)
Things you haven’t done or found and don’t care to: plain type
You are encouraged to add extra comments in brackets after each item.
Which of these apply to you?
    1.  Can name my 16 great-great-grandparents [Yes – see this 5 generation chart]
    2.  Can name over 50 direct ancestors [Yes – 261 – see this ahnentafel listing]
    3.  Have photographs or portraits of my 8 great-grandparents [Yes – see this 5 generation chart although I notice there I haven’t linked up a picture of Mum’s Mum yet]
    4.  Have an ancestor who was married more than three times [Not that I know of]
    5.  Have an ancestor who was a bigamist [Not that I know of]
    6.  Met all four of my grandparents [No – 3 of the 4 – my Mum’s Dad died when my Mum was 11 years old]
    7.  Met one or more of my great-grandparents [None]
    8.  Named a child after an ancestor [No Children]
    9.  Bear an ancestor’s given name/s [No – no ancestors that I know about called Roger]
    10.  Have an ancestor from Great Britain or Ireland [Yes – apart from parents and grandparents born in New Zealand, one great grandparent born in Australia, all the rest are from England and Scotland, and maybe Ireland]
    11.  Have an ancestor from Asia
    12.  Have an ancestor from Continental Europe
    13.  Have an ancestor from Africa
    14.  Have an ancestor who was an agricultural labourer [Yes – many of my ancestors were Agricultural Labourers]
    15.  Have an ancestor who had large land holdings [None that I know of]
    16.  Have an ancestor who was a holy man – minister, priest, rabbi [Almost – my father was a Lay Preacher who took services at distant churches from time to time.]
    17.  Have an ancestor who was a midwife [Not that I know of]
    18.  Have an ancestor who was an author [Not that I know of]
    19.  Have an ancestor with the surname Smith, Murphy or Jones [No – lucky me]
    20.  Have an ancestor with the surname Wong, Kim, Suzuki or Ng
    21.  Have an ancestor with a surname beginning with X
    22.  Have an ancestor with a forename beginnining with Z
    23.  Have an ancestor born on 25th December [Yes – Alexander Oliver and John Bourgoigne]
    24. Have an ancestor born on New Year’s Day
    25.  Have blue blood in your family lines [No – all red as far as I know…]
    26.  Have a parent who was born in a country different from my country of birth [No – both born in New Zealand]
    27.  Have a grandparent who was born in a country different from my country of birth [No – all 4 born in New Zealand]
    28.  Can trace a direct family line back to the eighteenth century
    29.  Can trace a direct family line back to the seventeenth century or earlier
    30.  Have seen copies of the signatures of some of my great-grandparents [No, but have copy of great great grandfather’s will – that’s better isn’t it?]
    31.  Have ancestors who signed their marriage certificate with an X
    32.  Have a grandparent or earlier ancestor who went to university [Not that I know of]
    33.  Have an ancestor who was convicted of a criminal offence [Not that I know of]
    34.  Have an ancestor who was a victim of crime [seems quite possible, but I don’t know about it]
    35.  Have shared an ancestor’s story online or in a magazine (Tell us where) [Some of these stories are my ancestors, others are about relatives.]
    36.  Have published a family history online or in print (Details please) [I think this website counts :-)]
    37.  Have visited an ancestor’s home from the 19th or earlier centuries [Yes – have been to several of the farms in Scotland where my ancestors worked as Labourers, and in a couple of cases seen what was likely the Bothee they lived in. Dovecot Hall was the last residence in Scotland of the Houliston family before the emigrated to New Zealand in 1860.]
    38.  Still have an ancestor’s home from the 19th or earlier centuries in the family
    39.  Have a  family bible from the 19th Century [Yes – have the bible of this couple]
    40.  Have a pre-19th century family bible
 

This quilt was made for Aunt Jean’s 70th birthday. It was a collaborative effort.

  • Design by Lisa
  • Some photo scanning by Roger
  • Some photo scanning by Carol
  • Photo work by Roger
  • Printing them on fabric by Roger
  • Putting the front panel all together by Lisa
  • Putting the back on it by Aunt Bev
Jean's Birthday Quilt

Jean's Birthday Quilt

 

On our way to Bar Harbor, Maine, we stopped in Rochester, New York, to visit my cousin Martin Lineham and his family.

Rochester is about 9 hours drive – 560 miles (900 km)-  from Grand Rapids when travelling via Cleveland, so we left a bit after 0830 and got to Rochester about 1730 (5:30 PM). We had a very enjoyable evening with Martin, his wife Nancy and their daughter Grace, and Nancy’s Mum Mary. Roger grilled chicken, hot dogs and shrimps, then we looked over a bunch of family photos, showed Grace some of her genealogy, and eventually to bed. Monday morning more of the same, then down to check out Martin and Nancy’s offices, then the drive to Hartford, Connecticut this (Memorial Day Monday) afternoon – 336 miles (540 km).

Sunday Dinner Appetisers

Out in the Cooper-Lineham back yard for pre-dinner appetisers while Roger cooked dinner on the Grill. Mary Cooper, Lisa Christensen, Nancy Cooper, Grace Lineham, Martin Lineham, Roger Moffat

More pictures below…

Continue reading »

 

Congratulations to Darrin Lythgoe.

TNG 8 – under development for about a year since the release of TNG 7 – was released today.

New & Improved in TNG 8:

  • Better Search: Hover over the results to see a dynamic summary of each person or family on the list.
  • Look and Feel: Most pages have been restyled for easier use and a nicer appearance.
  • Easier Installation: Do more right up front and hit the ground running.
  • Media: Enjoy a new image viewer, plus a more streamlined slide show.
  • User Roles: New labels make it simple to assign rights to members of your family or research team.
  • Relationship: Now locate multiple relationships between people in your file.
  • Search Engines: A few key changes should make your pages more visible.
  • People: Build your tree right from the pedigree page if you’d like.
  • Dates: New calendar page summarizes family events.
  • “Mod Manager”: Allows you to easily add or remove custom code changes.
  • Plus more than 100 other improvements! See a complete list of all changes here. Tested on all major browser platforms.

Information about the software can be found here on Darrin’s site.

I’ve been testing this for quite a few weeks now, helping iron out the kinks along with several other users and Darrin. There are some great new features and capabilities added.

I’ve got my TNG Testing site upgraded, and hope to have my main site done this evening yet.

Now we can wonder what Darrin will choose to include in TNG 9 🙂

 

Today – 19 May 2010 – was the 5th public meeting of the Michigan Center for Innovation and Reinvention Board, and the 4th one that I’ve attended. I had expected that this would be the last meeting before the Governor’s deadline of 1 June, but apparently that deadline has been pushed back a bit. There will be 1 more meeting on 25 June 2010 12 – 2 PM so the Board members can review their report which should be written by then, and then it will be submitted to Governor Granholm after that.

Today I signed up to speak in the Public Comment part of the meeting, after listening to the Board members in their deliberations, which today largely focussed on what the contents of the report are likely to be. I had a prepared statement copied which was distributed to the Board members as I started speaking – good thing too, since as unaccustomed as I am to public speaking, I managed to miss a couple of the points I wanted to make, so hopefully they read them. Below is the text:

Continue reading »

 

When: Wednesday evening, 12 May 2010.
Where: Archives side of the Michigan Library and Historical Center, Lansing, Michigan
What: To Celebrate the 2010 Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship Winner
Who: Randy Riley is the winner of the 2010 Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship

The Michigan Genealogical Council, in conjunction with the Michigan State Archives and Museum put on a gathering to celebrate Randy Riley’s award of the 2010 Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship. The venue was on the 2nd floor of the Michigan Historical Center, almost in amongst the exhibits.

The Backdrop

Looking over a table at the amazing backdrop for the evening - most of that is painted on the walls and ceiling.

A number of people with connections to genealogy in Michigan, and/or the Library of Michigan spoke glowingly of Randy’s contributions since joining the Library of Michigan.

Kim Harrison

Kim is a past president of the Michigan Genealogical Council, and currently works for Ancestry.com. On the left Randy is with Jan Alpert, President of the National Genealogical Society having just received the 2010 Filby Award.

The last speaker was the Man of Honour – Sir Randy of Filby (see below in photo gallery).

Randy's Speech

Randy was the last speaker. He spoke of the honour, and of how it is about the Collection and the Staff, not just about him.

A photo gallery of the evening follows… Continue reading »

 
Randy Riley receives 2010 Filby Award

Randy Riley receives 2010 Filby Award. Photo by Tom Koselka.

Congratulations to Randy Riley, Special Collections Manager at the Library of Michigan on his receiving the Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship at the National Genealogical Society Conference in Salt Lake City last Friday.

Here is the list of previous winners of the Filby Award:

  • 2009: No nominees met the qualifications for the Filby Award in 2009.
  • 2008: David Dearborn of New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • 2007: Curt Bryan Witcher of Allen County Library, Ft. Wayne, Indiana
  • 2006: Eric Grundset of DAR Library, Washington DC
  • 2005: Ron D. Bryant of the Kentucky Historical Society and the Kentucky State Parks Department
  • 2004: James Jeffrey of the Denver Public Library, Denver, Colorado
  • 2003: Carole C. Callard (1941–2005) of the Library of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan
  • 2002: Jim Hansen of the Wisconsin Historical Society Library, Madison, Wisconsin
  • 2001: Martha Henderson of the Mid-Continent Public Library, Independence, Missouri
  • 2000: Pamela Hall Cooper of Indian River County Public Library, Vero Beach, Florida
  • 1999: Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck of the Dallas Public Library, Dallas, Texas

So a quick look at that list quickly reveals that the Library of Michigan is the ONLY facility to have won the award twice – 2003 awarded to Carole Callard and 2010 awarded to Randy Riley. That speaks VOLUMES to the prestige with which the Library of Michigan’s Genealogical collection is held in the genealogy community.

This is the very same Library of Michigan that Governor Granholm is trying very hard to eviscerate by starving it of funding, and placing it in the Department of Education – a department already seriously short of the funding needed to fulfil its primary purpose – Education – where it is now hit even harder by funding difficulties.

Instead this facility should be maintained as the treasure that it is for the treasure that it holds. Let’s hope that

  • the Michigan Center for Innovation and Reinvention Board realises this and makes the appropriate recommendations to Governor Granholm in their report;
  • Governor Granholm recognises the value of the report and the process that led to it and acts accordingly.

1 June, when the report is due, isn’t so far away.

 

So we’ve now completed the 3rd week of the NBC series Who Do You Think You Are – based on the remarkably popular BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) series of the same name that has been running for some years now.

  1. Sarah Jessica Parker – a good story, but too many “un-be-liev-able”s for me. It apparently set the pattern for the series – a 2 min 30 second introduction of what the series is about. Each segment ends with a “what’s coming up after the break” and then the next segment starts with “here’s what we did before the break”. But great that she did find out she has ancestry back to the earliest history of the colonisation of North America with the Salem Witch trials.
  2. Emmit Smith – a great story – same criticisms as Episode 1, but it seemed a more compelling story as Emmit followed his ancestry across the “slave owning and trading South” to Africa. This was of interest to me as I have worked on the genealogy of a friend whose ancestors were born in slavery in Mississippi and North Carolina. This chart shows her ancestry. The people in the 4 light yellow boxes were all born in slavery.
  3. Lisa Kudrow – also a great story of travel and discovery. Although this only covered part of the 20th century as she travelled back to the village of Ilya in the Belarus to uncover what happened to her great grandmother and to Gdynia in Poland to meet a cousin who had bought news of the family’s terrible fate at the hands of the Nazis to New York not long after World War 2 ended.

Continue reading »

 

Over the last several weeks we have heard several times that the proposed funding of $7,500,000 for Michigan libraries is only 50% of what is required by law.

What law?

And if it’s a law, why is not complying with it subject of legal action by someone – there’s no shortage of lawyers that’s for sure!!!!

So I set out to try and find out just where this “requirement” is. It turns out that this was laid down in Act 89 of 1977 – State Aid to Public Libraries, which contains a list of the requirements that must be met by libraries in Michigan, categorises them based on the population they serve and lays out the amount of state aid that they must receive. See here, here and here for several presentations of Act 89.

From State Aid Guidelines on page 3 we see this list of the funding categories required in Act 89.

PA89, §13 Public library cooperatives shall receive 50¢ per capita for their served population.

PA89, §16(2) Public libraries shall receive 50¢ per capita for their served population if minimum standards are met.

PA89, §16(4) Public libraries that meet minimum standards and are members of a cooperative library shall receive 50¢ per capita to pay for services provided by the cooperative.
All or part of this amount shall be used to purchase these services.

PA89, §16(4) A cooperative shall receive $10 per square mile for the area it serves if the area has less than 75 persons per square mile.

PA89, §16(5) County public libraries serving a population of 50,000 or less with a director who meets educational requirements can receive a maximum of $400 per month or $4,800 annually for salary reimbursement. A form must be filed quarterly by the county library to claim the reimbursement.

So while I’m certainly no lawyer, one has to wonder why if there’s a law, then this law can’t be enforced?!?!

The main thing I got out of the Rally at the Capitol was just how important it is that Michigan Libraries receive $10,000,000 in funding – “only” 2/3rds of the required $15,000,000 – so that they then receive the $5,000,000 in Federal money which is what by and large seems to pay forMeL and MelCat. The Governor is proposing $7,500,000, while the Senate is proposing $10,000,000.

How hard is to to realise that for a further measly $2,500,000 they would be able to treble their money, since that last $2,500,000 would trigger the Federal $5,000,000. That’s a return on investment that it ought to be criminal to turn down.

This page MHAL – Significant Dates in Michigan Library History should be required reading for all decision makers before they decide to underfund the Libraries of Michigan, so that they might get even a small grasp of what they’re about to undo before they go and undo it!!!!

And finally (maybe) this from writer Anne Herbert

“Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.”

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