Richard Glass

Richard Glass

Male 1814 - 1887  (72 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document


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  • Gender Male 
    Born 31 May 1814  Spott, Haddingtonshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Census 6 June 1841  Horsely, Houndwood Quoad Sacra, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    • Parish of Houndwood Quoad Sacra Page 13
      Horsely
      Richard Glass 25 Lab Born in Berwickshire
      Agnes Glass 24 Born in Berwickshire
      Isabel Glass 11 months Born in Berwickshire
      Isabella Moffat 15 Born in Berwickshire
    Census 30 March 1851  Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    • Taken from 1851 Census Coldingham Parish Berwickshire Scotland. Page 28
      an indexed transcription by Graham and Emma Maxwell

      Book 4, Page 20
      Howpark
      Richd. Glass Head Married 36 Farm Servant East Lothian, Spott
      Agness Glass (Moffat) Wife Married 31 Berwick, Bunkle
      Isabella Glass Daughter Unmarried 10 Berwick, Coldingham
      Peddie Glass Daughter Unmarried 8 Berwick, Chirnside
      George Glass Son Unmarried 6 Berwick, Coldingham
      Robt. Glass Son Unmarried 1 Berwick, Coldingham
    Census 2 April 1871  Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    • Parish of Cockburnspath Page 18
      71 Blackburn
      Richard Glass Head Mar 55 Ag Lab Haddingtonshire, Spott
      Agnes Glass Wife Mar 51 Wife Berwickshire, Bunkle
      Isabella Glass Daur Unm 30 Outdoor Servt Berwickshire, Coldingham
      Robert Glass Son Unm 21 Ag Lab Berwickshire, Coldingham
      Alexander Glass Son Unm 19 Ag Lab Haddington, Oldhamstocks
      William Glass Son Unm 16 Ag Lab Berwickshire, Copath
      Richard Glass Son Unm 8 Scholar Berwickshire, Copath
      Catherine Glass Grand Daur 9 Scholar Berwickshire, Copath
      William Glass Grand Son 4 Haddington, Oldhamstocks
      Robert Glass Grand Son 1 Berwickshire, Copath
    Census 3 April 1881  Townhead, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 10
    •                   Marr Age Sex  Birthplace 
      Richard GLASS M 66 M Spott, Haddington, Scotland Rel: Head Occ: Ag Lab
      Agnes GLASS M 61 F Bunkle, Berwick, Scotland Rel: Wife
      Robert GLASS M 31 M Coldingham, Berwick, Scotland Rel: Son Occ: Ag Lab
      Mary GLASS M 23 F Innerwick, Haddington, Scotland Rel: Daur In Law
      Richard GLASS U 18 M Cockburnspath, Berwick, Scotland Rel: Son Occ: Ag Lab
      Richard GLASS 5m M Cockburnspath, Berwick, Scotland
    Died 13 January 1887  Old Cambus West Mains, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 4, 5, 11
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Notes 
    • Richard Glass was described as a 'Hind' in the OPR of marriages at Houndwood Church, Berwickshire, on 12 May, 1839.

      HIND: A married male farm worker who paid no rent, if his wife or another woman worker (a Bondager), helped during the harvest. The Hind kept a cow or perhaps, a pig and some poultry. He was given the keep of his cow, plus oatmeal, barley and peas, some ground to plant potatoes and flax. He was paid about £2 per month.


      From the book 'GRANTSHOUSE' by Jim Crosbie:-

      'FARM SERVANTS IN THE GRANTSHOUSE AREA
      Terms of Employment in Times Gone By

      In the eighteenth century many farm labourers in the parish of Coldingham (part of which was later to become the village of Grantshouse) were paid in kind rather than in cash. The entry for Coldingham parish in the Statistical Account of Scotland 1791-1799 states :–

      "The yearly gains or wages of a single hind in this parish are 10 bolls oats, 2 bolls barley, 1 boll pease, a house and a small kail yard, a cow's meat, land for sowing a firlot of potatoes, the carriage of three or four carts coals, from 20s to 30s for sheep money, their victuals while working at hay, or in the harvest; his wife reaps in harvest for the house, and she and her bairns, that can work, get from 3d to 6d a day, for weeding turnips and potatoes, and for gathering and carrying off stones from the sown grass grounds. The lotmen or threshers of corn get the 25th boll in name of wages; some farmers give them a bottle of small-beer at a certain hour of the day. which is very necessary and it enlivens them much. A ploughman or carter who lives in the farmer's house, gets from £6 to £7 yearly: a day labourer gets 10pence in winter, and 1s the rest of the year, winter being reckoned at four months; masons and wrights from 16 to 20 pence a day: the other tradesmen are commonly paid for piece work; a maidservant gets from £3 to £4 a year. All these wages, except the hinds and herds, who are paid in kind, have been raised a third part, at least, within these last 40 years. Even the hinds and herds are increased, by the difference of their cows meat and the sowing of potatoes; some of them are allowed to so a peck or a half of linseed, and every faithful servant commonly gets some additional gratifications from their masters and mistresses."

      By the middle of the nineteenth century, the monetary consideration was obviously the most important part of a farm-worker's earnings, as the new Statisical Account of Scotland 1845 reports that the daily wage of a farm labourer in Coldingham Parish was from 1s.6d to 2s in summer and from 1s.3d and 1s6d in winter, 'masons and carpenters a third more'. No mention is made of payment in kind although a house and possible a quantity of potatoes would presumable have been included. The report goes on to state - 'There are 55 hand-loom weavers in the village of Coldingham, who are employed by Glascow manufacturers to weave cotton, who for several years have received only 6s a week for working 13 hours a day.

      The evidence of the Statistical Accounts would seem to indicate that farm servants were living on the right side of the breadline, but their hours of work were long – a note in the book Bondagers (a collection of the reminiscences of eight women who worked as bondagers on Borders farms in the first part of the twentieth century) states that farm workers "generally continued to work a 6-day week of at least sixty hours until 1919, when hours for many, though by no means all, were reduced to about 50 a week". Mary King, one of the bondagers, confirms – "mah father he aye worked on Seturday efternins right up tae the First World War or efter that" (her father was a ploughman at Northfield, near St Abbs).

      Farm workers were usually engaged for a period of one year at a time and, if the farmer wished to re-engage an employee, that worker was 'spoken to' (i.e. asked to stay on for another year). If a worker was not 'spoken to', or if he wanted a change of employer, he attended a Hiring Market (at Duns, Berwick or Dunbar) where he had to stand until he was approached by a farmer (it was not permitted for a worker to approach a farmer). Farm labourers who were able to supply a female bondager (often an unmarried sister or a daughter) were usually in greater demand than those who had only themselves to offer.

      Mary King testifies – "there was one place at Grantshouse ca'ed Butterdean and he (her grandfather, Alexander Paxton) was there seven times. Ah've often heard ma mother tellin' that story aboot ma grandfaither. He wis seven times back at Butterdean. He would shift for a shillin' …And if he wis gaun tae get a shillin' mair he'd shift for that. And he did, he did, he shifted every year".

      At least two farm workers in the Grantshouse area took their employers to court in the early years of the twentieth century. In November 1900 the Berwickshire News reported that Alexander Purves successfully sued Arthur Hardy, the farmer at Dowlaw in the Small Debt Court at Greenlaw for £2 18s 9d, "being wages unpaid for a period of one week in February last, when pursuer was laid off work by influenza, and for a further period of about 6 weeks in April and May, when he was again laid off work while suffering from ringworm. Witnesses were adduced to prove that this was the custom of the district – that servants in the position of the pursuer were not paid any wages when off through illness. The sheriff said that no matter what the custom was, the law was that where a servant was off through illness for a short period the employers were liable for wages".

      In 1909 William Plenderleith sued his employer, James Wight, farmer at Greenwood, for £30 for wrongful dismissal. The facts of the case were summed up as follows by Sheriff-Substitute Macaulay Smith:-

      William Plenderleith was engaged by James Wight as a farm servant for the year to Whitsunday 1909 and he was to bring with him a male worker. Plenderleith's wages were to be 18 shillings per week, with free house and 1800 yards of potatoes. The wages of the said male worker were to be 13 shillings per week.

      Plenderleith, under said engagement, supplied his brother Alexander as said male worker.

      About 7.00 p.m. on Monday 1 February Plenderleith informed the farm manager that he desired to go to Dunbar Hirings on the following day (Tuesday) along with his brother.

      The farmer at this time had already engaged the services of a steam threshing mill for operations on his farm on the said following day, this fact having been known to Plenderleith for about a week previously.

      The said operations required the attention, not only of all the regular farm hands, but also a number of extra workers whom the farmer had already engaged, this also being known to Plenderleith.

      The farm manager informed Plenderleith that only in the event of the said mill failing to arrive in time to begin operations next morning could he and his brother be allowed away.

      The said mill arrived at the farm the same night (Monday) shortly after 9 o'clock, and during a period of more than half an hour was being located in circumstances easy of observation.

      Plenderleith either knew, or could by the exercise of ordinary attention have known, of its arrival.

      Notwithstanding the said arrival, Plenderleith on the following morning (Tuesday) went off to Dunbar along with his brother.

      About 7 o'clock that evening (Tuesday), after the return of Plenderleith and his brother, the farmer sent for them and dismissed them from his employment, on the grounds of disobedience of his orders.

      Shortly after the date of the Dunbar Hirings, two other Hiring Markets were held – at Duns and Berwick respectively.

      The Sheriff-Substitute ruled that, in accordance with custom, a farm servant was legally entitled to offer himself for a new situation and that right involved access to a hiring market. He also ruled, however, "that the servant's rights must be reasonably exercised and that in that exercise, the interest of the master as well as that of the servant, must be fairly considered". His judgement was:-

      Plenderleith's request, at the time and in the circumstances in which it was made, was not a reasonable one and leave of absence, in such circumstances, could not be demanded as a legal right.

      Plenderleith's conduct on Tuesday 2 February in going to Dunbar was, in effect, in the circumstances stated, insubordination, on account of which the farmer was justified in dismissing him'.

      Jim Crosbie - September 2002
    Person ID I518  Roger
    Last Modified 13 March 2009 

    Father Robert Glass,   b. 27 September 1775, Wooler, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes - date unknown  
    Mother Pedie Brown,   b. 2 August 1777, Eyemouth, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. before 1824  (Age < 46 years) 
    Family ID F9349  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family/Spouse Agnes Moffat,   b. 18 December 1819, Hoardweel, Bunkle & Preston, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 March 1901, Tower Farm, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 12 May 1839  Houndwood, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Children 
    +  1. Female Isabella Glass,   b. 15 July 1841, Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 April 1919, Goodall’s Place, Nungate, Haddingtonshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
       2. Female Pedie Glass,   b. 31 December 1842, Chirnside, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 December 1865, Oldhamstocks, Haddingtonshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
    +  3. Male George Glass,   b. about 1845, Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 November 1918, Buxley, Tranent, Haddingtonshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 73 years)
    +  4. Male Robert Glass,   b. about 1850, Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes - date unknown
       5. Male Alexander Glass,   b. about 1852, Oldhamstocks, Haddingtonshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes - date unknown
       6. Male William Glass,   b. about 1858, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes - date unknown
       7. Male Richard Glass,   b. 4 February 1859, Penmanshiel, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 March 1859, Penmanshiel, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +  8. Female Eliza Glass,   b. 12 April 1860, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes - date unknown
    +  9. Male Richard Glass,   b. 10 October 1862, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 August 1927, Dunglass, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    Family ID F58  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 31 May 1814 - Spott, Haddingtonshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 6 June 1841 - Horsely, Houndwood Quoad Sacra, Berwickshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 30 March 1851 - Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 2 April 1871 - Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 3 April 1881 - Townhead, Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Farm Town Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Documents
    1841 Census for Parish of Houndwood Quoad Sacra (formerly known as Coldingham), Berwickshire, Scotland
    1841 Census for Parish of Houndwood Quoad Sacra (formerly known as Coldingham), Berwickshire, Scotland
    Shows Richard Glass with his wife Agnes Moffat, their daughter isabel and Agnes' sister Isabella
    1851 Census for Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland
    1851 Census for Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland
    Copy of transcription provided by eMail by Olive Hooton. Shows Richard Glass and Agnes Moffat and 4 of their children born before 1851
    1871 Census for Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland
    1871 Census for Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland
    Page shows the Glass family living at 71 Blackburn - Richard Glass with wife Agnes Moffat, their children Isabella, Robert, Alexander, William and Richard, and 3 illegitimate children of Isabella Glass

  • Sources 
    1. [S521] Chart showing descendants of George Moffat and Isabella Clark, provided to Roger by Sandy Bain.
    2. [S523] Index and transcription to 1881 British Census, published by the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
    3. [S524] Vital Record from Old Parish Registers of Scotland, published by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
    4. [S2351] GEDCOM file titled “glass.ged”, from Angus McDonald.
    5. [S2365] Roger's Genealogy.
    6. [S2458] Old Parish Birth Register - Search Results from Scotland's People.
    7. [S756] British Census of 1841 for Houndwood Quoad Sacra, Berwickshire, Scotland.
    8. [S555] British Census of 1851 for Coldingham, Berwickshire, Scotland.
    9. [S731] British Census of 1871 for Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland.
    10. [S556] British Census of 1881 for Cockburnspath, Berwickshire, Scotland.
    11. [S2456] GEDCOM file titled “Robert Glass Ancestors.ged”, from Sandy Bain.
    12. [S2470] GEDCOM file titled “Glass.ged”, from Sandy Bain.


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